Category Archives: Spirit connection

How does a psychic reading work?

I am asked on occasion, just how I get the information I do when providing a reading and how it all works. 

When giving readings, I first ask Spirit to provide me with guidance on how I can best help the person I am reading for, and ask them to give me the answers to what you most need to know right now. These messages may come from my Spirit Guides or yours, or from loved ones on the Other Side. Alternatively, guidance may come through from other entities (eg Ascended Masters, Angels). In addition to intuited guidance, I may use just one, or a mixture of different cards, or I may not use cards at all. The majority of the , guidance in a reading is provided intuitively and is channelled directly from Spirit. 


Most of the messages I receive from Spirit come to me as words, names or images/visions (clairaudience and clairvoyance), and quite often through a ‘knowing’ (claircognizance). I also at times use automatic writing as a way of receiving direct communication from Spirit. 

I am always more than happy to elaborate or explain things further should there be any information in a reading that isn’t understood. I also welcome questions after someone receives a reading, because at times, something may come up that prompts questioning from my clients. I never charge people for this; it’s all part of the service.

I do not sugarcoat information that comes to me in a reading (pretending that everything is just butterflies and rainbows) however I do make sure I am respectful and compassionate when passing on sensitive information. Quite often, if someone has requested a reading, it’s because there is something challenging happening in their life at the time, and so more often than not, sensitivity and empathy is necessary. 

Another thing I’ll add, for those of you that decide to have a face to face reading, is that quite often I’ll pick up on your energy while reading for you, or the energy of a loved one in spirit, and so if I start crying, that’s why. Sometimes the emotional energy is quite overwhelming and I feel this energy quite strongly. It might be an overwhelming feeling of love from someone in spirit, or it may be the feeling of relief from being connected to a loved one. Whatever it is, know that this energy is shared with me to help me connect with you on such a deep level. 

If you ever have any questions about how I provide readings, please feel free to ask me at any time. 

❤️ Christie 

White Light for the Soul

The Empath Mum

As anyone who’s an Empath knows, it’s not always easy. Nor is being a parent; but when you combine the two, it can be mayhem! Of course, being both a Mum and an Empath has its rewards too. 

For anyone who isn’t familiar with the term Empath, here is a brief description (you may just find yourself reading this and having an ‘aha’ moment).

An Empath is someone who feels and takes on the emotions and energy of other people, situations and environments. This is not just empathy, but fully feeling these emotions and energy as if they were your very own. Empaths also have a ‘knowing’ that goes beyond gut feelings or intuition.  

So, you can probably imagine that in addition to the everyday challenges that being a parent entails, adding this gift to the mix certainly makes for an interesting experience day in, day out. 

Don’t get me wrong; being an Empath as a mother gives me some wonderful advantages. Having this ‘knowing’ means that I’m able to relate to my children on such a unique level, and the majority of the time, I needn’t even ask what’s wrong because I just ‘know’. Even if there’s not necessarily anything amiss with one of my children, I still know exactly what they need at any given time; whether it means they’re getting sick or just need to snuggle for a while. 

For example, my two year old who isn’t quite verbal as yet, can simply look at me and most of the time, I know exactly what he needs or wants without trying to figure it out by questioning him. Sometimes, I’m even onto it before he is! 

The difficult side to this gift is being able to feel my children’s emotions as my own  when it becomes overwhelming for me. As everyone does, we all have challenges in life to deal with, and emotions of our own to understand and process, but when you add three more little people’s emotions to this, it can become quite daunting and make you feel like you’re carrying around the weight of the world. For example, if my teenager is feeling all hormonal and confused about his world, I feel it too. If my baby girl feels genuinely heartbroken because Dad just left to go to work, I feel it too. You get the gist…  

At times, I’ve felt like just curling up in a ball and crying, and that’s okay, because it is a very overwhelming gift to have. But at the same time, I am extremely blessed to be able to share this wonderfully deep connection with my children. Once I was aware of what it means to be an Empath, and learnt more about it, things started to become much easier, and I now see this gift in a whole new light. 

There are likely many, many parents out there who can completely relate to what I’m describing, and I want you to know that you’re not alone; and you’re certainly not crazy (even though at times, it may feel that way)! Being an Empath can be challenging and painful at the best of times, but when you’re a parent as well, and don’t know how to manage this gift, your heart and mind can get quite messy indeed. 

But, once you have the awareness, and the tools to properly manage everything that being an Empath entails, you will quickly realise just how very special a gift it is, and why you’ve been blessed with it. It’s not always easy, but the rewards that come with this gift far outweigh the challenges. 

I am more than happy to connect with anyone who would like to chat about this further, or who would simply like to share their experiences of being an Empath parent. I can be contacted through either of my Facebook pages here:

White Light for the Soul
White Light Publishing House

I am a Lightworker

Last night, I received a message on my Facebook page from someone, and her words really stuck out to me for several reasons; one of them being that she had just confirmed for me that I am 100% on the right path in life.

Her message simply read: 

“I don’t think I’ve every met a psychic so willing to help people. You’re the real deal.”

I sat there for a moment, pondering what this meant, and why it touched me so deeply. 

The first thing I did was smile from ear to ear with gratitude, and I was quick to respond to her that I am just human, like everyone else, and that I do the work I do to help people; not to get rich. As someone who is offering guidance to others, while I need to earn a living, I still genuinely care about everyone’s well being, and my compassion and love for helping others isn’t just limited to doing so through paid services. That’s not what being a lightworker is about; not in my opinion, anyway.   The reason for this person contacting me in the first place actually had nothing to do with readings or spiritual awareness. And again, just because someone may contact me about an issue, doesn’t mean I’m going to automatically try and promote my services either. If I know I’m in a position to help someone based on a shared life experience, or because I have the tools and knowledge to help another person to evolve, I’m more than happy to help out. Why would I limit my reach for helping others by putting a price on everything? To me, that’s just silly.

On the other side of things, of course, I don’t want to be taken advantage of either, and that’s why I limit any free readings I offer to people, because I’m a realist; I know it does happen. However, providing paid services for people is very different to simply lending a listening ear, or doing what I can to guide someone in a positive direction. Gee, even when I do a reading for someone, I’m always more than happy to elaborate or provide further guidance and tools if my client wishes. A reading shouldn’t end with “OK, your hour’s up, I’m done.” Again, that’s my opinion, but that’s the way I work anyway. 

Every psychic/reader works in different ways, and I respect that, however I see myself as a true lightworker, and this beautiful person who messaged me last night, helped me to truly appreciate this within myself. I’m not just a “psychic” or someone who reads for other people. 

I am a lightworker. I genuinely care about others, and my mission is to bring more light into the world. 

Goodbye for now, Nepal

I knew that visiting this amazing country was going to be a trip of a lifetime, but I never really imagined that I would learn as much as I did; about the Nepali culture, about religion, about humanity, but most of all, I realised that my spiritual growth is still expanding day by day. I’ve mentioned in a previous blog post about just how genuine and kind the people of Nepal are, and this is something that will remain ingrained in my memory and heart forever. But it’s not just the people; its the natural wonders of Nepal, and the powerful energy that is felt here. I have never experienced anything like it, and I hope to hold onto that feeling for a very long time; long after I’ve returned home. If I could bottle the energy of being here, I would, so I could share it with everyone I know.    

 Our last few days in Nepal were spent with magnificent views of the Himalayas (both from our hotel balcony, and from the air), taking in sunrises and sunsets, and sharing stories with locals. We visited a few more Buddhist temples (including the World Peace Pagoda and Swayambhunath), and I must say that the Buddhist philosophy strongly resonates with my own values and beliefs. It is something that I intend on delving deeper into once I get home. 

 
It was sad to say goodbye to Nepal, but I know that I am forever changed from the experience that the Nepali people have given me. See you again one day!
Namaste

 

The Nepali people have life all figured out 

I have had some wonderful discussions with many local people here in Nepal, and each and every one I speak with, has me nodding my head, and saying, “Yes!”

The Nepali people have life all figured out. 

Even after the devastation that they have experienced less than a year ago, with the massive earthquake that has left so many people homeless, and having lost loved ones, they are nothing but happy, kindhearted, and genuinely grateful for everything they have.  

 

The streets and traffic are insane, with not a road rule seeming to be in existence, yet we have not seen one person get angry, impatient, or frustrated. Drivers remain calm, and are so patient with one another, that there doesn’t ever seem to be an issue. We spoke with one of the taxi drivers about this, and he explained that while people may be in a rush to get from here to there, so is everyone else, and there’s no point in getting angry at each other. From what we have seen on the roads, the Nepali people just want to get on with their day, but also make sure they are looking out for one another. 

The earthquakes in April and May have brought the Nepali people together in so many ways, and through so much sadness and loss, they’ve managed to pull together to help one another rebuild homes, and lend each other a helping hand in any way they can; whether it means financially supporting one another, providing food and blankets, or just being there for each other. From what I have seen and heard from the many stories told by locals, the people of Nepal were already a very kind and supportive people, but now, more than ever, the devastation they experienced as a nation, has just amplified their beautiful nature, and they seem to truly understand the meaning of humanity as a whole. 

I truly believe that every person could learn a thing or two from the beautiful people of Nepal. Many of us seem to forget and take for granted some of the small things in life that may seem minor to us, but are extremely important here. Things like acknowledging one another in the street, not judging another based on appearance, culture, beliefs or life choices. Things like having enough food every day, having clean drinking water, or access to petrol to get around. Having somewhere to sleep at night, or clothes to wear. Having someone you can talk to when you need support. Having your loved ones alive and healthy. Children having access to education, or at the very least, someone to care for them. 

Every single person I have met here; whether it be in conversation, or just a hello along the street, has been friendly, has a smile for me and a heartfelt “Namaste”, which is not only spoken, but is a genuine energy exchanged between two people. When I hand someone extra rupees because I feel as though they deserve more than what they’ve asked for selling me something, or for their wonderful service, they are genuinely grateful and it shows in their eyes. When I tell someone there’s no need to be ‘sorry’ or to treat me any differently because they somehow feel that I expect them to cater to my every need because I’m a tourist, they breathe a sigh of relief, and I can feel a knowing between us. A knowing that we understand one another as fellow human beings who are equal. 

Our tour guide Yagya, said something beautiful the first day we met him; “I am not perfect. Life is about learning. Some things I know more than you, some things you know more than me. We are here to learn from each other.” That, we are. If we could only all begin by adopting the simple, yet powerful practice of the Nepali people in sharing a genuine “Namaste” to one another, the world may be a different place. 

Namaste: “I honour the place in you where the universe resides. When I am in that place in me, and you are in that place in you, there is only one of us.”

The word, “Namaste” contains a word “Nama” which means “negating or reducing one’s ego in the presence of another”. Meaning, when people greet each other with “Namaste” they accept their existence.

When two people greet each other by joining their ten fingers, a vibe is produced, and when a person closes his/her eyes, and bow their head before another person, an energy is developed from heart – to – head. And finally, exerted through his/her head. This energy links one person to another, and every time it is done, an honour is developed; respect is created. 

Namaste can elevate one’s consciousness, reminding us that all beings, all existence, is sacred. It also tends to draw an individual inward for a moment; inspiring reflection on deeper realities, and softens the interface between two people.  

 If we could reach a time and place where we all genuinely practice ‘Namaste’ to our fellow human beings, we could very well be much closer to achieving peace in the world. 

The Nepali people have life all figured out. 

A day in Pokhara (with a trip to the hospital too!)

26 February 
We woke up this morning to the sound of the Buddhist monks drumming at the Peace Pagoda, and it was such a beautiful way to wake up! Outside our window I could see the still, almost glass like water of Phewa Lake, and the light of the sun slowly rising from behind the mountains. 

 After breakfast, the first place we visited was Devi’s Fall. Just a short stroll off the Main Street, Devi’s Fall is named after a woman who was swept away by the water and died while bathing in it. We threw some coins into the Wishing Pool, and then walked across the road to Gupteshwor Madahev Cave.  

As we made our way down the stairs to the cave entrance (yes, lots of stairs like everywhere else), we saw a young woman who was making her way down also, but was being held on either side by loved ones. She looked to be quite fearful and upset about something (whether she was scared of going into the dark, or something else, I’m not sure. I dare say it was due to much more than a fear of the dark) but her legs were weak, she was crying and moaning, and was clearly distressed about something. Most of the way down was dark and wet, and I really felt for this woman as she got closer to the temple that stood deep inside the cave. We were prohibited from taking photos, as this temple was so very sacred.  

 Once we made it to the temple, this young woman threw herself to her knees and began chanting and throwing rice upon herself and ringing the bells that surround it. This temple was in a cage-like structure and the guard that stood nearby opened it for her. She went inside and continued to moan and cry as she crawled around around the small temple. We wanted to give her privacy, but before we moved along, I found a piece of rose quartz I’d had in my bag, and asked the guard to please give it to her from me. I placed my hand on my heart and said, “it’s for love”. I don’t know whether he ended up passing it along to her; I hope he did, but I said a little prayer for her anyway as we continued along.

A few more levels of climbing down rocks and we were there inside the main part of Gupteshwor Madahev Cave. I could just feel how very sacred a place this was, and stood for a moment, watching the waterfall crash against the rocks in this dark, yet powerful cave. I tried to take many photos, but the lack of light inside meant that each photo was unclear or blurry (I did seem to capture a couple of orbs though).

After we climbed back up, we visited the Mountain Museum. In here there was an abundance of information, which Yagya helped us to understand. He seemed completely in his element as he gave us information about the mountains, the people and cultures, and many other things. We had originally taken the museum off our list of things to see, but Yagya encouraged us to see it, and I’m glad we did.  

 My hand was now getting a bit sore and swollen from last night’s fall, and we had already decided it would be best to have it checked out, so we made our way to the Namaste Hospital in Pokhara. Immediately upon entering I was seen by triage, and the whole thing was such a surreal experience. It felt like something out of an old movie, because everything was so laid back. The nurses gave me a shot of something in my bottom (a painkiller) and a tetanus injection (even though I’m up to date- better safe than sorry). The doctor who came around with his little girl in tow wanted blood tests and an X-ray done, and so I can waited for the results of those to come through. When the doctor mentioned that if the infection in my hand was too serious, I would need to be admitted, I prayed that this wouldn’t be the case. Visiting the emergency department for a couple of hours, and being admitted to s hospital in a foreign country with regular power outages, are two completely different scenarios. Luckily, the X-ray came back ok, and my blood count; while a little high which meant my hand was infected, I wouldn’t need to be admitted. I was told to be very careful, and was given a script for some strong antibiotics, and we were done. I was considering calling my travel insurance company, but when I saw how much the bill was (for services, medications, injections, X-rays), it was only a total of around 7000NRP (which is around $85AUD). My excess would have cost me more than the total bill, so I let it be. 

 By the time we got out of the hospital, it was after 2pm, and we were all very hungry. The taxi driver dropped us off out try front of a restaurant called Boomerang, and so we thought, what better place to eat than here? This restaurant was right on the edge of the lake, and it was very peaceful to sit and watch the boats and paragliders. After a delicious meal we took a paddleboat over to Bahari Temple, which is on an island on Phewa Lake. The sun was setting while we were there, so it was just gorgeous.  

 We got back to our room around 7pm and after a very quick bite to eat, we just needed to sit, so we spent a little time on our balcony, then headed to bed early, ready for a big drive ahead tomorrow to Nagarkot.

Visit with the children 

24th February


This morning we began our day by having another lovely (large) breakfast at the Penguin Boutique Hotel. We said goodbye to the very kind staff and made our way to our new hotel, Kantipur Temple House. What a beautifully designed hotel it is! It feels like we are in another world, and as I write this, I am sitting out in the courtyard surrounded by beautiful wooden carvings and a luscious garden. I could stay here for a long time, but tomorrow, we head off to Pokhara, and we will be back here in four days time. 

After we settled into our new room, we went for a wander around Thamel, and of course, did some more shopping. We were stopped by a lovely man who asked if we were from Australia, and usually, I would have said yes briefly then walked on, however for some reason I stopped to have a chat. He introduced himself as “Um” (pronounced Om), and that just made me feel as though it was even more significant a meeting. We ended up going inside to sit down and talk more inside his shop, and had a lengthy discussion about life, spirituality, and what it means to be on this path we call life. He was not at all surprised to find out the work that I do, as he said he felt the energy from my heart as we were walking down the street, and that’s why he felt drawn to talk to me. Once again, I had met someone who held the same values as my own, and we could have talked for hours, and he taught me a Nepali term that sums up my feelings: “Shanti Shanti”, which means ‘peace peace’. We exchanged Facebook details and off we went up the street to the Garden of Dreams.  

The Garden of Dreams is situated on a very busy intersection in Thamel, and you wouldn’t imagine there being such a beautiful, peaceful place just inside the walls that surrounded it. Upon entering, I felt immediately relaxed, and the luscious gardens and sights of people laying on the grass reading books, or spending time with loved ones, was very welcoming.  

 We were then met by Rabi, who is the beautiful man who runs the Big Umbrella House in Kathmandu. He takes in children who are on the street (for various reasons- domestic violence, alcoholic parents etc) and he took us to the house where they’re living. The children were just arriving home from school, and they were so excited to meet us; one little boy grabbing my hand to take me on a tour of the house. After we had a look around, all of the children sat down to do their homework. It warmed my heart to see just how eager the children were to do their homework; some were drawing, some writing, and some reading. Their English was extremely good and we told them so (which of course, they were very proud of)!  

 These children are just so appreciative of small things; for example, I took out a scrapbook and started to draw, and they were all so excited to receive one sheet of paper each to draw on. “Look, Ma’m”, they were saying over and over again. It was lovely, and no matter how many times we said it was ok to call us by our first names, they still used the term ‘Ma’m’.

In a group of thirteen boys, there is also one girl staying there, and what a fiery, excitable little lady she was! She had found a bunch of rubber bands tied together and was bouncing the rubber bands on a book up and down, so I grabbed a book as well and asked her to throw it to me. We ended up playing makeshift ‘tennis’ with two books and a bunch of rubber bands for ages. One of the older boys wanted a turn and so we took it in turns to see how many times we could bounce the ‘ball’ on the book before dropping it. Such simple games, but at the same time, so very beneficial, and it reminded me of working in childcare again.  

 Just before we were due to go home, we gave the children a notebook each, some new pencils and pens, some drawing paper, and other items that Mum had brought over for them. There was also a book on Australia and Victoria, and they were fascinated by the different things they were seeing in these books. It was especially amusing to hear them try to pronounce ‘Uluru’. I wrote a little message in a couple of the children’s books, and it made me so happy to see them copying out and reading the words that I had written amongst one another. I do hope that these words stay with them for a long time. 

I wrote: “Always be yourself”